The Process

Congratulations on deciding to Kosher your kitchen!

The Koshering process itself is more technical than mystical. The Code of Jewish Law has stipulated that if a kitchen utensil or accessory can expunge the taste which it has absorbed, it can be Koshered, becoming a new utensil minus any previous absorbed taste. An exception to this (one of several) is earthenware; we can never be sure that it has fully expunged its absorbed taste due to the nature of its makeup. All new and never used items are considered Kosher. 

What Can be Koshered...

Metal pots, most cutlery, some metal baking utensils, glass, metal frying pans, some kitchen knives, the stove-top, the oven, the broiler, the outdoor grill, certain dishwashers, etc. 

What Cannot be Koshered...

Earthenware, china, Teflon-coated items, glass bake-ware, certain plastic, etc. (There are some methods by which the some of the previous items mentioned can be koshered, this will have to be discussed with the Rabbi.) 

How You Should Prepare...

After discussing with us what can be koshered, we will help you decide if
extra sets of pots, utensils and cutlery have to be purchased for your new meat and dairy kitchen. If you will be running a strictly meat, strictly dairy or strictly vegetarian kitchen discuss this with the Rabbi. Also, all items to be koshered must be clean, handles should be removed from pots and grime removed with a scrubber and soap. 

What to Expect...

Items that were used in either, a cooking situation or serving situation where heat was involved will be purged in boiling water. Items that were
used in a baking or frying situation may need to be exposed to fire. Nothing to get the jitters about. Our staff are trained to attend to all details but your help is greatly appreciated. 

Taking Utensils to the Mikvah...

Metal and glass utensils should be immersed in a Mikvah prior to being used, whether they are new, never used or newly Koshered. We will direct you to a local Mikvah or provide the pickup and delivery service for you.